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October 27, 2017 -
September 30, 2019
Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association
October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.
St. Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
May 25, 2018 -
September 30, 2020
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.

CO-PRESENTING MAY 25, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 2, 2018:
ROOSEVELT HOUSE (REIMAGINING THE FOUR FREEDOMS)

OCTOBER 13, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019:
THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
DEARBORN, MI


FEBRUARY 9, 2019 - MAY 6, 2019:
THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
WASHINGTON, DC


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


The New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 15, 2018 -
June 02, 2019
Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting
The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 29, 2018 -
August 31, 2019
Baseball Americana
Americans had been playing baseball long before they agreed on the rules or even settled on how to spell it.

Base-Ball (1787)
base-ball (1799)
base ball (1818)
Base Ball (1845)
baseball (1899)

They didn't always call it baseball either—in some places it was known simply as "town ball" or, more generically, "round ball." No matter what form it has taken, baseball—and its close fraternal twin, softball—has endured. But it hasn't stayed the same in anyone's lifetime. Former major leaguer and announcer Bob Uecker, on hearing the phrase "emotional distress" to describe poor hitting, observed, "When I played, they didn't use fancy words like that. They just said I couldn't hit."

Baseball Americana features items from the Library of Congress collections and those of its lending partners to consider the game then and now—as it relates to players, teams, and the communities it creates. Although baseball has stayed true to many of its customs, it has also broken with tradition through the invention, competition, and financial interests that still make it the most played sport in the country.

8:30am - 4:30pm

South Gallery, 2nd Floor
Library of Congress Jefferson Building
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 04, 2018 -
August 18, 2019
Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today
Drawing primarily from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition will explore how American artists have chosen to portray themselves since the beginning of the last century. As people are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media and as they continue to examine the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to the country’s history and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 75 works by artists such as Josef Albers, Patricia Cronin, Imogen Cunningham, Elaine de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Joan Jonas, Jacob Lawrence, Alice Neel, Louise Nevelson, Diego Rivera, Lucas Samaras, Fritz Scholder, Roger Shimomura, Shahzia Sikander and Martin Wong. “Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today” is curated by Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator, National Portrait Gallery. This exhibition concludes the Portrait Gallery’s 50th anniversary celebrations, and an expanded, illustrated companion book will be published in spring 2019.

11:30am - 7am daily

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 12, 2018 -
June 30, 2020
Magnificent Obsessions
The impulse to collect is human. We collect for many reasons: to gather information about the world, to preserve the past, or to follow our interests and desires. For some, it is a lifelong pursuit.

Pioneering collectors have long shaped Smithsonian Libraries. Each had their own unique passions, from hot-air balloons to seashells, from Japanese prints to world’s fairs. Together, these diverse collections form a vast network of knowledge.

Smithsonian Libraries continues to build upon the work of these curious collectors. We preserve historic treasures and everyday items to provide a window onto the past. We seek out new sources and collections to advance research and scholarship. And we share our collections with the world to inspire curiosity and spark new ideas. Like a modern day cabinet of curiosity, Smithsonian Libraries collections span eras and disciplines, enabling discovery, inspiring creativity, and illuminating history.

Our collections are living and breathing. What will we collect next?

10am - 5:30pm
(summer hours may vary)

Smithsonian Libraries Exhibition Gallery
Smithsonian National Museum of
American History
14th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 29, 2018 -
August 04, 2019
Reimagining Captain Cook Pacific perspectives
250 years ago James Cook left England on the first of three expeditions to the Pacific Ocean. A skilful navigator, he visited many places new to Europeans and his voyage accounts were widely read and celebrated. Today, his legacy is sometimes debated. In the Pacific, Islanders continue to remember the encounters that occurred, reimagining them in artworks which reflect on their impact.

This exhibition explores these Pacific perspectives and displays the work of contemporary Pacific artists, alongside objects collected on the voyages themselves. Michel Tuffery’s powerful painting Cookie in the Cook Islands, imagines how Cook might have been transformed by his Pacific experiences. Lisa Reihana’s Taking Possession, Lono, shows Captain Cook and his men about to hoist the British flag on a Polynesian island, raising questions about what each group might have understood by the idea of ‘taking possession’. An imposing Tahitian costume worn at ceremonies to mark the death of a chief, is on display for the first time in many decades. Collected on Cook’s second voyage and one of only a handful still in existence, it has been extensively conserved.

As commemorations abound on this major anniversary, this exhibition considers some of the complexities of Cook’s legacy in the Pacific, from New Zealand to Vanuatu and from Australia to the islands of Hawaii.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Please note: the gallery will be closed to the public on April 10th, 2019

Free admission

Room 91
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
January 26 -
July 21, 2019
Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange across Medieval Saharan Africa
Journey to a medieval world with Africa at its center.

Travel with the Block Museum along routes crossing the Sahara Desert to a time when West African gold fueled expansive trade and drove the movement of people, culture, and religious beliefs.

Caravans of Gold is the first major exhibition addressing the scope of Saharan trade and the shared history of West Africa, the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe from the eighth to sixteenth centuries. Weaving stories about interconnected histories, the exhibition showcases the objects and ideas that connected at the crossroads of the medieval Sahara and celebrates West Africa’s historic and underrecognized global significance.

Caravans of Gold draws on recent archaeological discoveries, including rare fragments from major medieval African trading centers like Sijilmasa, Gao, and Tadmekka. These “fragments in time” are seen alongside works of art that invite us to imagine them as they once were. They are the starting point for a new understanding of the medieval past and for seeing the present in a new light.

Presenting more than 250 artworks spanning five centuries and a vast geographic expanse, the exhibition features unprecedented loans from partner institutions in Mali, Morocco, and Nigeria, many of which will be seen in North America for the first time.

The Block Museum exhibition will travel to The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto (Sept. 21, 2019 – Feb. 23, 2020) and then to the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute (April 8 – Nov. 29, 2020)

Tue, Sat, & Sun 10am - 5pm
Wed, Thu, & Fri 10am - 8pm
Mon CLOSED

Main Gallery
Block Museum of Art
Northwestern University
40 Arts Circle Drive
Evanston, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 30 -
August 30, 2019
Women Get the Vote: A Historic Look at the 19th Amendment
The legendary crusade for women's suffrage began in 1848 at a historic meeting in Seneca Falls, New York, and culminated in 1920 when the country ratified the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. It was a battle led by some of the most remarkable women of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Over the long span of the nineteenth century, growing numbers of women joined the suffrage movement, claiming basic rights for themselves and generations to come in the face of threats including mob violence, arrest, and imprisonment. Campaigns were marked by both successes and reverses, often intersecting with the abolitionist movement before and during the Civil War. Nevertheless, suffragists persisted until victory was theirs.

In Women Get the Vote, selections from the Library’s holdings bring to light the literature from a social and political revolution that reverberates down to the present day. Books, archival materials, and rare treasures on display include the early suffragist publication Votes for Women Broadside; Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and the 1882 edition of History of Woman Suffrage, edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage. Also featured are biographies of Alice Paul, the British suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst, and legendary abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.

Women Get the Vote also showcases the activities of two Library members engaged in the struggle: Mrs. John Winters Brannan, the daughter of newspaper editor Charles A. Dana, who was sentenced to imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse in Lorton, Virginia for picketing the White House, and Rosalie Gardiner Jones, known for her fiery views on women’s rights.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

Reception: January 29th
And we're seeking members' loans for a one-night display. We encourage you to look in closets, cupboards, and attic trunks for suffrage memorabilia, including posters, banners, pins, books, photographs and letters. Blow off the dust and bring them to us.

2nd floor, The Peluso Family Exhibition Gallery
The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
July 14, 2019
An Earthly Paradise: William Morris & The Thames
This new exhibition illustrates the rich and little-known story of William Morris’ deep connections to the Thames. We bring together a unique selection of works, with loans from the V&A, The William Morris Gallery, British Library, and many more. Highlights include Morris’ Thames series of textiles alongside his original hand-drawn designs, a signed copy of News from Nowhere, and his personal fishing tackle and spectacles. Materials from the Morris & Co. workshop illustrate the production process, while socialist pamphlets that Morris penned and published demonstrate his deep commitment to socialism in later life.

The influence of the Thames and its tributaries flowed through William Morris’ life and work. The river provided the setting for his leisure time spent angling and boating, inspiration for his designs and writing, and the ideal water conditions for the manufacture of his textiles. One notable Thames boat trip from his London home via Henley to his rural retreat in Oxfordshire was so moving that it inspired his socialist utopia novel, News from Nowhere.

Explore the Thames through Morris’ eyes: a beautiful retreat from urban excess and the capitalism he despised, a valuable resource continuing the river’s working heritage, and a rich source of creative inspiration. Step from the exhibition straight out onto the riverbank and find your own earthly paradise.

11am - 4pm

River & Rowing Museum
Mill Meadows
Henley on Thames
Oxfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01 -
July 19, 2019
Gabriel García Márquez: The Magic of a Global Writer
In 1965, Gabriel García Márquez was a Colombian writer living in Mexico City and mostly unknown beyond Mexican and Colombian literary circles. For almost two decades he struggled to become a full-time fiction writer. In 1967, the publication of One Hundred Years of Solitude and its ensuing international success transformed its author into one of the most celebrated writers of the twentieth century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982.

Drawing primarily on the García Márquez Collection at the Ransom Center, the exhibition, comprising approximately 150 items including numerous documents never seen in public before, will explain to visitors how García Márquez became a literary star and a classic writer. Throughout his life, García Márquez repeatedly thanked his family and friends for their support. Woven throughout the exhibition, correspondence, photos, and videos, will illustrate how García Márquez's intimate circle supported his literary career.

Mon - Wed & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Admission is free, but donations are encouraged

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 02 -
June 30, 2019
Small Inventions: Artist’s Books by Charles Hobson
Small Inventions celebrates the Museums’ acquisition of 29 works by San Francisco artist Charles Hobson as a gift of collector Marian Kinney. Over the past three decades, Hobson has been a proponent of the book as a hybrid work of art and as a tool for visually communicating complex ideas. His process calls for expanding the definition of what can be called a book and devising a unique form for each volume in relation to its content. His books become physical embodiments of their textual concepts, engaging the reader as an active collaborator and transforming reading into a participatory rather than passive activity. The artist incorporates surprising physical objects into these books to illuminate unexpected relationships. About this exhibition, he says, “I’m hopeful that the viewer might see how much an artist’s book is conceived and driven to fruition by finding just the right invention.”

Tue – Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm

Legion of Honor museum
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 04, 2019 -
January 01, 2020
Patrick Bronte: In Sickness and In Health
The Brontë siblings are as famous for their deaths as they are for their novels and poetry, and tragically Patrick Brontë outlived all his children, as well as his wife. Our 2019 exhibition explores how illness, poor health and death plagued his life.

Although tragic, the Brontë deaths were unremarkable in an over-crowded village where 46% of children died before reaching
the age of six. The average life expectancy was twenty-five years, which corresponded with that of some of the unhealthiest districts of London. Patrick campaigned relentlessly for improvements to public health, but sadly, these came too late to benefit
his own family. As a minister, Patrick was expected to have an informed knowledge on how best to advise and assist those of his parishioners who couldn’t afford medical treatment. His medical text books, which will be collectively on display for the first time, provide us with an insight into his determination to aid the sick and document his own fascinating discoveries.

Highlights of the exhibition include the handkerchief used by Anne Brontë and spotted with blood from her infected lungs; Patrick’s medical manuals heavily annotated with his own experiences; Charlotte’s pillbox, which still has pills inside; Patrick’s tobacco pipe and the extensive collection of spectacles owned by the Brontë family. Thanks to a loan from Thackray Medical Museum, we will also display the type of ophthalmic instruments which would have been used to perform Patrick’s cataract surgery and a laudanum bottle, similar to those bought by Branwell from the apothecary in Haworth.

April to October: 10am - 5.30pm
November to March: 10am - 5pm

Free with admission to the Museum

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 07 -
August 04, 2019
The World Exists To Be Put On A Postcard
artists' postcards from 1960 to now

Artists have subverted the common postcard for decades. While the artists’ postcard began as a child of the Conceptual and Fluxus movements of the 1960s, it quickly broadened as an artistic medium to highlight political and social issues, such as feminism, anti-war protest and the fight against AIDS.

In this, the first major museum display of artists’ postcards, discover both the politics and playfulness of this unique collection of 300 postcards recently gifted to the British Museum by the artists’ postcard expert Jeremy Cooper - ranging from feminist artists such as Lynda Benglis and Hannah Wilke, to Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s anti-Vietnam War is Over postcard and the original invitation to Andy Warhol’s Holy Cow! Silver Clouds!! Holy Cow! exhibition.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Free admission

Room 90
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
February 09 -
July 14, 2019
The Rise of Everyday Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America
See more than 200 items including books, drawings, furniture, decorative arts objects, photographs, and flyers, broadsides and advertising ephemera that offer a new and detailed look at the history of the Arts and Crafts movement.

The Arts and Crafts movement occupied a central place in discussions about modern life in Britain and America from the late 1840s to the early 1920s and beyond. Arts and Crafts reformers were concerned with the daily realities of the industrial age, and used design to envision and promote a new and improved way of living.

Discover how theorists and makers—like John Ruskin and William Morris (along with lesser known figures like Lucy Crane) in Britain and Candace Wheeler, Alice and Elbert Hubbard, and Gustav Stickley in America—spread their ideas through books, retail showrooms, and world's fairs, and how Arts and Crafts objects, which were originally handmade and costly, came to be manufactured and sold to the everyday consumer.

Items on display from the Ransom Center's collections will include hand-drawn designs and sketches by Ruskin and Morris, a first edition copy of Owen Jones's Grammar of Ornament, books and marketing materials of the Kelmscott and Roycroft presses, stained glass designs by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne-Jones, and plates from Frank Lloyd Wright's Wasmuth portfolio. These items will be paired with photographs, furniture, and decorative arts objects from the University's Alexander Architectural Archives, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and private collections.

Opening on the 200th anniversary of John Ruskin's birth, the exhibition will show how the Arts and Crafts idea made its way into everyday homes, transforming the lives of ordinary people in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and remaining influential to this day.

Mon - Wed, & Frid 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
300 W. 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
July 08, 2019
Celia Paul
An exhibition of seven paintings by contemporary British artist Celia Paul (born 1959), the eponymously titled “Celia Paul” is curated by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Hilton Als, staff writer and theater critic for The New Yorker and associate professor of writing at Columbia University. Featuring work selected by Als in collaboration with the artist as a testament to their transatlantic friendship, “Celia Paul” focuses on Paul’s recent paintings, which address the themes of memory, family, and the inner lives of women. The exhibition was the inaugural installment in 2018 of a trilogy at the Yale Center for British Art; the next two exhibitions in the series there will focus on the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye in 2019 and Njideka Akunyili Crosby in 2020.

10am - 5pm

Huntington Art Gallery
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, & Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
February 11 -
June 08, 2019
"Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”
Spring exhibit on the Irish author best known for his cult classic novel, The Third Policeman. “Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”

Flann the novelist. Myles the columnist. Brother Barnabas the student. Brian O’Nolan (1911-1966) wrote in many genres under many guises, in both English and Irish, confounding contemporaries with his incomparable genius and satirical wit.

Using original manuscripts, letters, books, and artifacts from Burns Library’s unrivaled collection of O’Nolan’s papers and personal library, the exhibit will unmask the most enigmatic and elusive literary figure to emerge from 20th-century Ireland next to James Joyce.

The exhibit will also feature new and original works by Irish artists David and Eddie O’Kane, who have been creating and exhibiting Flann-inspired drawings, paintings, and animated and live-action videos at the biennial International Flann O’Brien Society conferences and other venues. An opening reception on February 12 will include curator-led viewings of the exhibit beginning at 4:30pm and a presentation by the O’Kanes at 5:15pm, followed by opportunities for conversation and more exhibit viewing. All are welcome.

The exhibit will be complemented by podcast and iBook projects created by students from professor Joseph Nugent’s Fall 2018 course, “From Page to Pod: Making Literature Public.”

9am - 5pm

John J. Burns Library
Boston College Libraries
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut Hill, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
July 07, 2019
Jan Tschichold and the New Typography
Graphic Design Between the World Wars

Tracing the revolution in graphic design in the 1920s, this exhibition displays materials assembled by typographer and designer Jan Tschichold (1902–1974) in Weimar Germany. Published in Berlin in 1928, Tschichold’s book Die Neue Typographie was one of the key texts of modern design, partly due to its grasp of Constructivist ideas and new print technology, but equally, because it was a manual for practicing designers. In the years leading up to its publication, Tschichold struck up a correspondence with many European artist-designers, including Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, Herbert Bayer, Piet Zwart, and Ladislav Sutnar, among others. In the course of this, Tschichold exchanged and acquired many examples of their design work, some pieces now quite famous (such as El Lissitzky’s Pro dva kvadrata [The Story of Two Squares], 1920) while other items are modest and ephemeral, such as tourist brochures, handbills, headed notepaper, product catalogues, and magazine advertisements. This collection, purchased by Philip Johnson and donated to the Museum of Modern Art, will form the basis of this exhibition, tracing the development of the new ideas that revolutionized graphic design in the 1920s.

Tue, Fri – Sun 11am – 5pm
Wed, Thu 11am – 8pm

Bard Graduate Center Galery
18 West 86th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 14 -
July 14, 2019
Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50
The Stonewall Riots were a flash point in LGBTQ history. After the riots that took place at the Stonewall Inn in June 1969, the LGBTQ civil rights movement went from handfuls of pioneering activists to a national movement mobilizing thousands under the banner of Gay Liberation.

This exhibition illustrates this history through the photographs of Kay Tobin Lahusen and Diana Davies, two pioneering photojournalists, who captured the pivotal events of this era and changed the ways that LGBTQ people perceived themselves. Featured alongside these images are other items from the Library’s vast archival holdings in LGBTQ history, including ephemera, periodicals, and more.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am – 8pm

Rayner Special Collections Wing
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 16, 2019 -
December 31, 2020
John James Audubon’s The Birds of America
Today only about 200 complete sets of The Birds of America exist. The Museum’s set, bound in four leather portfolios, was acquired by the State of North Carolina in 1848 and kept for more than a century at the State Library before being transferred to the Museum. The hand-colored engravings were recently conserved and rebound. In the new Audubon Gallery, the NCMA presents Audubon’s work in special cases designed for each of the enormous “double elephant” volumes, with hydraulic lifts that allow staff access so that the pages can be turned periodically to display a new selection of birds.

Tue – Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays & some holidays

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART
2110 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC
Exhibit South
February 28 -
June 15, 2019
Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection
Women’s work. The phrase usually conjures up domestic duties or occupations largely associated with women—such as teaching, nursing, or housekeeping. The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection upends those associations. By bringing together materials from across the centuries, Baskin reveals what has been hidden—that Western women have long pursued a startling range of careers and vocations and that through their work they have supported themselves, their families, and the causes they believed in. The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection is now part of Duke’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture. This exhibition provides a first glimpse of the diversity and depth of the collection, revealing the lives of women both famous and forgotten and recognizing their accomplishments.

Wed, Feb 27th:
Exhibition Preview at 5pm
Mary Duke Biddle Room
Stone Family Gallery & Trent History of Medicine Room

Reception at 5:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Commons
Rubenstein Library, 2nd Floor

Program 6pm
Gothic Reading Room
Rubenstein Library
West Campus

A Conversation with Lisa Unger Baskin, featuring Naomi Nelson, Associate University Librarian and Director, Rubenstein Library, with introductory remarks by Edward Balleisen, Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies

Mary Duke Biddle Room, Sperling Family Exhibit Cases, Michael & Karen Stone Family Gallery, & The Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room
Duke University
411 Chapel Drive
Durham, NC
Exhibit South
March 01 -
June 15, 2019
The Word Embodied: Scripture as Creative Inspiration in Twentieth-Century Book Arts
An exhibition of livres d’artistes, artists’ books, and fine press editions of the Bible.

Twentieth-century printers and artists developed aesthetic principles that articulated the power of the book to influence the reader’s experience of a text. They endeavored not simply to copy or illustrate Scripture but to embody it in a meaningful form. Whether austere or exuberant in design, these books were conceived to give countenance to the spirit within. This exhibition explores the book as a creative expression with special attention paid to artistic philosophies, the inspiration behind specific works, the roles of illustration and letterform, and the significant achievements of women in the book arts.

“The Artist and the Book”: Panel Discussion and Reception
On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 4:00—6:30 pm Bridwell Library will host a reception and panel discussion featuring guest speakers Anna Lovatt, Assistant Professor of Art History at SMU and Catherine Craft, Curator at the Nasher Sculpture Center. The panel will commence at 4:30 pm. Exhibition curator R. Arvid Nelsen will offer guided tours.

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
March 04 -
December 16, 2019
Writing Women’s Rights: “The pen in their hands”
In the library we have a display of writers from Bathsua Makin (c.1600-c.1673) to Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) who took on issues of equality, gender difference, biology as destiny, women in politics, education and equal pay. Issues we think as intrinsically modern have their origins in the long eighteenth century. Long before the Suffragists and Suffragettes, long before feminist movements and #MeToo, the pen was in these eighteenth-century women’s hands!

11am – 4.30pm
Last entry 4pm

Chawton House
Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 04 -
December 16, 2019
Jane Austen’s Reading
The main exhibition at Chawton House in 2019 focuses on Jane Austen’s reading; both books she had access to and those that influenced her writing.

The books exhibited are all held at Chawton House and come from either our early women writers collection of works or from the Knight book collection. At one time, the Knight collection was owned by Jane Austen’s brother Edward, who was adopted into the Knight family, and as such it was a library known to and used by Jane Austen herself.

Highlights of the exhibition include the copy of a novel we believe Jane Austen read, a first edition of Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, and an opportunity to learn more about the new Godmersham Park virtual library.

11am – 4.30pm
Last entry 4pm

Chawton House
Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 05 -
June 16, 2019
The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated
A major international loan exhibition focusing on the artistic tradition inspired by Japan’s most celebrated work of literature will go on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art beginning March 5, 2019. Bringing together more than 120 works of art from 32 public and private collections in Japan and the United States—including National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties, most of which have never left Japan—The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated explores the tale’s continuing influence on Japanese art since it was written around the year 1000 by the noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu (ca. 978–ca. 1014). Often referred to as the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji has captivated readers for centuries through its sophisticated narrative style, humor and wit, and unforgettable characters, beginning with the “radiant prince” Genji, whose life and loves are the focus of the story.

The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated will present the most comprehensive introduction to the visual world of Genji ever shown outside Japan. It will feature nearly one thousand years of Genji-related art—an astonishing range of works including paintings, calligraphy, silk robes, lacquerware, a palanquin for a shogun’s bride, and popular art such as ukiyo-e prints and contemporary manga—and provide viewers with a window into the mysterious and even exotic world of the Heian imperial court (794–1185) that was created by the legendary authoress.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Galleries 223–32, Floor 2
The Sackler Wing,
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 12 -
June 09, 2019
Oscar Rejlander: Artist Photographer
Often referred to as the “father of art photography,” Oscar G. Rejlander has been praised for his early experiments with combination printing; for his collaboration with Charles Darwin; and for his influence on the work of Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll. This groundbreaking exhibition is the first major retrospective on Rejlander, highlighting new research and a selection of works brought together for the first time.

Open 10 am–5:30 pm
Saturday 10 am–9 pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

The Getty Center
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
March 21, 2019 -
February 09, 2020
Thinking 3D: Leonardo to the present
For centuries, artists and scientists have wrestled with how to convey three-dimensional objects on the page. Using some of the Bodleian Libraries’ finest books, manuscripts, prints and drawings, Thinking 3D tells the story of the development of three-dimensional communication over the last 500 years.

The exhibition shows how new techniques, developed from the Renaissance onwards, revolutionized the way that ideas in the fields of anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry were relayed and ultimately how this has influenced how we perceive the world today. Timed to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, the exhibition shows how Leonardo and his contemporaries made great strides in the realistic depiction of 3D forms. Thinking 3D explores technological advances up to the present day including 3D modelling, photography and stereoscopy; and also highlights the works of modern practitioners and researchers in Oxford.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a range of smaller exhibitions and events across Oxford in 2019 as part of the Thinking 3D research project.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

Treasury, Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
March 21 -
July 24, 2019
We the People: American Prints from Between the World Wars
Explore prints depicting the good times, hard times, and war-time experiences of everyday Americans in the 1930s and 1940s.

Despite the hardships of the Great Depression, American printmaking blossomed during the 1930s. Government relief programs provided artists of all backgrounds new opportunities to collaborate and experiment. Meanwhile, print clubs and art associations made their works available to the broader public.

People of all classes could see themselves in works of art that reflected their own lives: at work, at play, and at home. Explore these democratic works created by American artists for the American people.

This exhibition celebrates two recent gifts of modern American prints from Hersh and Fern Cohen to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Mon CLOSED except some holidays*

* Holiday Hours
Open New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day & Columbus Day

Closed 4th of July

Adults: $20
Seniors (65 & over): $18
Students (with valid ID): $14
Youth (13–18): $14
Children (12 & under): Free
Members: Free

Korman Galleries 121–123
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 23 -
June 16, 2019
Copies, Fakes and Reproductions: Printmaking in the Renaissance
Artistic training in the Renaissance involved drawing, or copying, from nature, from antique sculptures and from the work of other acclaimed artists. While Raphael and Michelangelo were painting for the Popes in Rome, skilled printmakers such as Marcantonio Raimondi and Giorgio Ghisi were widely disseminating the painters’ famous compositions through the relatively new medium of engraving. Not all artists, however, wanted their creations reproduced by others. This exhibition will present works which showcase the various intentions behind copies, ranging from collaborations between designers and printmakers to the unauthorized copies of Albrecht Dürer’s woodcuts, which resulted in a landmark legal decision against image piracy.

Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 11am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Third Thursday of every month
10am - 9pm

Blanton Museum of Art
The University of Texas at Austin
200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
March 28 -
August 30, 2019
To the Moon: The Science of Apollo
July 20, 2019, marks the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s and Buzz Aldrin’s first steps on the moon. Five additional Apollo missions sent 10 more astronauts to the lunar surface where they gathered rock samples and conducted scientific experiments. The exhibition, To the Moon, will relive Project Apollo and the behind-the-scenes story of how science got to and from the moon.

West Gallery – “The Science of Apollo”

Visitors to the west gallery will explore each of the six Apollo missions that successfully landed on the lunar surface. Using NASA images, mission reports, technical reports, and other material from the Library’s collection, topics will include: geological features of the landing sites, the science experiments deployed by the astronauts, and Apollo’s scientific legacy.

Alcove – “Go for TLI”

At 8:30 p.m. on December 21, 1968, Mission Control in Houston informed the Apollo 8 crew that they were “go for TLI,” trans-lunar injection, the engine burn that would take the spacecraft on a trajectory to the moon. For the first time in history, humans left earth orbit. Visitors to the alcove will learn how NASA engineers accomplished the feat of getting spacecraft and astronauts to and from the lunar surface, beginning with the lunar-orbit rendezvous decision made in 1962 to the “all up” testing of the Saturn V rocket, and the ultimate triumph of Project Apollo with the safe return of every astronaut.

East Gallery: “Mapping the Moon: A History of Lunar Cartography”

Visitors to the east gallery will view rare books from the Library’s History of Science collection that range from the 17th century to the 1960s. Books on display will include Galileo’s 1610 Sidereus Nuncius to works by Johannes Hevelius, Robert Hooke, Tobias Mayer, William Pickering, Gerard Kuiper, among many others. The gallery will conclude with images and maps from NASA’s and the Soviet Union’s unmanned lunar probes of the 1960s.

Mon – Fri 9am -5pm
2nd Sat of each month 10am - 2pm

Free admission

William N. Deramus III Cosmology Theater
Linda Hall Library
5109 Cherry Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
March 29 -
September 15, 2019
YINKA SHONIBARE MBE: THE AMERICAN LIBRARY
The American Library by Yinka Shonibare MBE is a celebration of the diversity of the American population and acts as an instigator of discovery and debate. The six thousand books in this art installation are covered in the artist’s signature Dutch wax printed cotton textile. These fabrics were originally based on Indonesian batik textiles, made in the Netherlands and sold in West Africa. Since the 1960s this fabric has been celebrated as a symbol of African identity. The mixed origins of the fabric make it a perfect metaphor for the multicultural identity embedded in the history of the United States.

On the spines of many of these books are, printed in gold, the names of people who immigrated, or whose antecedents immigrated to the United States. On other books are the names of African Americans who relocated or whose parents relocated out of the American South during the Great Migration. These names include W. E. B. Du Bois, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Steve Jobs, Bruce Lee, Ana Mendieta, Joni Mitchell, Toni Morrison, Barack Obama, Steven Spielberg, Carl Stokes, Donald Trump and Tiger Woods. These people have all made a significant contribution to aspects of American life and culture and represent every field from science to activism, music, philosophy, art, and literature. Most of these people have also experienced varying degrees of discrimination and hardship during and after their or their family’s relocation. A further set of books within the library features the names of people who have spoken out against immigration, equality or diversity in America.

Free with general admission

1927 Galleries 1 & 2
Speed Art Museum
2035 South Third Street
Louisville, KY
Exhibit South
March 29 -
July 27, 2019
Walt Whitman: America's Poet
Two hundred years after his birth, Walt Whitman remains one of America's most influential writers, arguably our national poet. His life's work, Leaves of Grass, is a perennial best-seller, and Whitman himself has attained the status of cultural icon, his name nearly a byword for notions of inclusivity, equality, sensuality, and the value of the individual.

Drawing from collections across the Library, Walt Whitman: America's Poet examines many of the individuals, beliefs, and experiences that shaped Whitman's work while also noting his literary legacy and continuing cultural impact.

Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am - 8pm

Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III Gallery
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd Street & Fifth Avenue)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 31 -
June 23, 2019
Nancy Spero: Paper Mirror
A celebrated figure in the cultural life of New York City, Spero produced a radical body of work that confronted oppression and inequality while challenging the aesthetic orthodoxies of contemporary art. Among the first feminist artists, Spero drew on archetypal representations of women from diverse cultures and times in an attempt to reframe history itself from a perspective that she termed “woman as protagonist.” Organized by Julie Ault, Paper Mirror brings together more than 100 works made over six decades in the first major museum exhibition in the U.S. since the artist’s death.

12pm - 6pm

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Avenue
Long Island City, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 01 -
August 30, 2019
Power in My Hand: Women Poets, Women Artists, and Social Change
A shared yearning for free expression has animated an enduring solidarity between women poets and artists. Using words and images, brimming with passion and determination, they communicate with and inspire one another across geographic boundaries and historic eras. Such devotion is evident in Muriel Rukeyser’s honor poem for the German artist Käthe Kollwitz and in Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party homage to Emily Dickinson. The critic Lucy Lippard has argued that “making poetry out of politics, making art from lives lived outside of power, and making politics out of that art and poetry—these are the three solid dimensions, the third power of the women’s liberation movement.” This collection of printed poems, artists’ books and art objects celebrates these creative and social bonds.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 05 -
October 27, 2019
Revolutionary Reflections: French Memories of the War for America
The American Revolution marked the beginning of an age of democratic revolutions that swept over France and challenged the old order throughout the Atlantic world. French officers who served in the American War of Independence, whether as idealistic volunteers or resolute soldiers of their king, were caught up in the turmoil of their generation. Their journals, memoirs and portraits, brought together in an exhibition drawn largely from the collections of the Institute, reflect their impressions of Revolutionary America and their memories of service to king and country and to the cause of American independence.

Tue - Sat 10am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati
Anderson House
2118 Massachusetts Avenue NW (between 21st & 22nd streets)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 07 -
August 04, 2019
Toulouse-Lautrec and the Stars of Paris
The invention of celebrity in 19th-century France

Aristide Bruant snarls. Loïe Fuller swirls on stage in the “serpentine dance.” The critic Édouard Dujardin eyes Jane Avril as they listen to the vulgar songs of Yvette Guilbert. These are celebrities of 19th-century Paris made famous by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, who captured the spectacle of the fin de siècle in evocative posters, prints, and paintings.

“Toulouse-Lautrec and the Stars of Paris” explores the celebrity culture of Lautrec’s time and the artist’s fascination with the personal lives of les stars as well as the roles that they played. With expressive lines and brazen colors, Lautrec depicted the defining gestures, costumes, and expressions of spectacular performers, many of whom were his personal friends and habitués of Montmartre, the focus of Parisian nightlife and a haven for acrobatic dancers and destitute students, reprobate aristocrats and middle-class pleasure-seekers.

The exhibition includes more than 200 works and is composed of thematic sections highlighting Lautrec’s formal innovations, such as dramatic lighting effects and color combinations; the changing artistic and social landscapes of Paris, with scenes of the city by day and by night; cafés, cabarets, and theaters; and celebrities of the age. The display also incorporates works by Lautrec’s contemporaries Edgar Degas, Honoré Daumier, Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, and others—presenting him in the context of his heroes, peers, and followers. Organized by the MFA in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the exhibition draws on both institutions’ rich holdings, and includes key loans of paintings and graphic arts from public and private collections.

Mon, Tue, Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed - Fri 10am – 10pm

Members Free
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Children 6 and under Free
Youths 7–17* Free / $10*
Students (18+)** $23**

*Youths 7–17 admitted free weekends, weekdays after 3 pm, and Boston public school holidays; otherwise admission for youths is $10.
**Participants in the University Membership program receive free admission. NH and ME resident students also receive free admission.

Ann and Graham Gund Gallery (Gallery LG31)
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
April 13, 2019 -
January 05, 2020
A Monument to Shakespeare
The Architecture of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Henry Clay Folger and his wife Emily wanted to create a monument to Shakespeare in the U.S. Capitol. This would be their gift to the American people, an architectural presence on Capitol Hill, and an anchor to the nation’s cultural mile. This exhibition shows how Henry, and after his death, his wife Emily, worked with architect Paul Philippe Cret to create a marble building that looks like a book, and speaks to the hope that Washington DC would become a cultural center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 26 -
August 27, 2019
Writing: Making Your Mark
Follow the remarkable evolution of writing from ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs carved in stone and early printed text such as William Caxton’s edition of The Canterbury Tales, to the art of note-taking by some of history’s greatest minds, and onwards to the digital communication tools we use today.

Marvel at centuries of human innovation as writing enabled progress and opened doors to expression and art. Items as diverse as James Joyce’s annotated copy of Ulysses and a 60,000-strong petition against Bengali partition, sit alongside Burmese tattooing instruments and a new take on typography by the Russian artist El Lissitzky to illustrate how writing allows us to enact change and make a lasting creative mark of our own.

Our interactive exhibition gives you the chance to reflect on works of genius that wouldn’t exist without the writing traditions of civilisations past. Be dazzled by gold-laden Japanese calligraphy. Study Mozart’s musical flourishes. Pore over Alexander Fleming’s pioneering notebook. Each of these written records carries the history of writing in their every stroke.

Finally, reflect on writing’s future and the role you’ll play in an increasingly digital world. Will we abandon pens and keyboards for voice and video messaging, or continue to carry the traditions of ancient times with us? Consider what sort of writer you are and leave us with some final words of your own.

9:30am - 18:00pm

PACCAR 1
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
April 30 -
July 21, 2019
The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts
The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired study and devotion among scientists, theologians, and artists alike during the Middle Ages. The belief in angels, demons, and spirits moreover materialized in wondrous works of art, especially on the pages of illuminated manuscripts. Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena informed every aspect of one’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being in the premodern world. This exhibition invites you to explore the complexity of the celestial realm in medieval European faith and science traditions.

Sun - Fri 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Getty Center
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 03, 2019 -
March 29, 2020
In Mid-Sentence
Photographs are often replete with words that remain unheard. “In Mid-Sentence” presents a selection of photographs from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery’s collection that depict moments of communication: intimate confessions, public speeches, exchanged jokes, political confrontations, lectures and more. Photographs featured in this exhibition encapsulate pivotal moments, such as John F. Kennedy’s televised speech for the 1960 Democratic National Convention or Walter Cronkite’s clandestine 1971 meeting with Daniel Ellsberg at the time of the publication of the “Pentagon Papers.” The exhibition provides the missing script for these otherwise silent voices, granting another means for understanding these interactions by placing them within their socio-historical contexts. An illustrated brochure accompanies the exhibition, and several of the represented speeches are included in an interactive kiosk. The exhibition is curated by Leslie Ureña, associate curator of photographs, National Portrait Gallery.

11:30 AM - 7:00 PM daily
Closed Dec 25th

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 03 -
August 18, 2019
Garry Winogrand: Color
Garry Winogrand: Color is the first exhibition dedicated to the nearly forgotten color photographs of Garry Winogrand (1928–1984), one of the most influential photographers of the twentieth century. While almost exclusively known for his black-and-white images that pioneered a “snapshot aesthetic” in contemporary art, Winogrand produced more than 45,000 color slides between the early 1950s and late 1960s.

Coming from a working-class background in the Bronx and practicing at the time when photographs had little market value, Winogrand did not have the resources to produce costly and time consuming prints of his color slides during his lifetime. Yet, he remained dedicated to the medium for nearly twenty years.

The exhibition presents an enveloping installation of large-scale projections comprising more than 400 rarely or never-before seen color photographs that capture the social and physical landscape of New York City and the United States. On his numerous journeys through Midtown Manhattan and across the country, Winogrand explored the raw visual poetics of public life—on streets and highways, in suburbs, at motels, theaters, fairgrounds, and amusement parks. For him, the industrially manufactured color film, which was used by commercial and amateur photographers, perfectly reproduced the industrially manufactured colors of consumer goods in postwar America. By presenting this group of largely unknown color work, Garry Winogrand: Color sheds new light on the career of this pivotal artist as well as the development of color photography before 1970.

Wed, Fri, Sat, & Sun 11am – 6pm
Thu 11am - 10pm
Mon & Tue CLOSED

Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Pkwy.
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 11 -
November 10, 2019
STRANGE LIGHT: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF CLARENCE JOHN LAUGHLIN
Dubbed the “Father of American Surrealism,” Clarence John Laughlin (1905–1985) was the most important Southern photographer of his time and a singular figure in the development of the American school of photography. The High boasts one of the largest and most important monographic holdings of Laughlin’s work and will celebrate his important legacy with this exhibition, the most comprehensive posthumous presentation of his work to date.

Strange Light surveys Laughlin’s signature photographs between 1935 and 1965 from more than 80 prints in the Museum’s collection, including many from a landmark 2015 acquisition that will be on view at the High for the first time.

Laughlin considered himself a writer first and a photographer second, and he saw image-making as a form of visual poetry. Known primarily for his atmospheric depictions of the decaying antebellum architecture that proliferated in his hometown of New Orleans, Laughlin approached photography with a romantic, experimental eye that diverged strongly from the style of his peers, who championed realism and social documentary.

The exhibition explores Laughlin’s literary leanings in great depth by placing his photographs in relationship to Southern Gothic literature and other regional literary genres, which were widely popular in the 1940s. Strange Light also attests to Laughlin’s innovative approach and insight into photography’s development.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

The High Museum of Art
1280 Peachtree Street NE
Atlanta, GA
Exhibit South
May 14 -
August 18, 2019
Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World
Unicorns, lions, and griffins race, tumble, and soar through the pages of bestiaries – the medieval book of beasts. The bestiary brought creatures – both real and fantastic – to life before a reader’s eyes, offering both devotional inspiration and literary enjoyment. A kind of encyclopedia of animals, the bestiary was among the most popular illuminated texts in northern Europe, especially in England, during the Middle Ages (about 500-1500).

The exhibition explores for the first time in a major museum exhibition the bestiary and its widespread influence on medieval art and culture. It features one-third of the world’s surviving Latin illuminated bestiaries and gathers together more than 100 works in a variety of media from institutions across the United States and Europe, including manuscripts, paintings, tapestries, sculpture, and decorative arts from the Middle Ages. A final section includes modern and contemporary works that trace the enduring legacy of the bestiary tradition. The Getty Museum’s three medieval bestiaries, including the famed Northumberland Bestiary (English, about 1250-1260) are central to the exhibition, and provided the inspiration for the exhibition’s theme.

Tue - Fri & Sun 10am - 5:30pm
Sat 10am - 9pm

Free admission, parking rates vary.

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 15 -
July 27, 2019
Poet of the Body: New York's Walt Whitman
How did a carpenter’s son, grammar school dropout and sometime hack writer become America’s greatest poet? To commemorate Whitman’s 200th birthday on May 31, 2019, this landmark exhibition showcases New York's role in the extraordinary transformation of Walter Whitman Jr. to “Walt Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son.”

Whitman is now universally acclaimed as the "Good Gray Poet" and for his Civil War writings, though less is known of his early years as a Long Islander, Brooklynite and self-described "Manhattanese." The exhibition presents the story of his coming of age as a poet through a unique assemblage of rare books, manuscripts, and artifacts, many never before seen, from the Whitman Collection of Susan Jaffe Tane, archives such as the Feinberg Collection at the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library's Berg Collection, private family collections, and forgotten treasures from Bryn Mawr College's Special Collections and the Brooklyn College Library. Highlights include every American edition of Leaves of Grass published during Whitman's life, manuscripts and one-of-a-kind books that have remained in private hands from his time to our own, his pen, his cane, and even locks of his hair encased in exquisite Victorian rings.

Interactive features of the exhibition allow visitors to experience Whitman and his New York in 3-D using modern stereograph technology, to take a virtual walk with Walt down Broadway circa 1850, and examine a colorful, surprising array of Whitman-related ephemera.

A celebration of Whitman's enduring relationship with the metropolis that sired and inspired him, the exhibition is curated by collector Ms. Tane and Dr. Karen Karbiener, NYU Clinical Professor and Whitman scholar.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Ground floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
August 17, 2019
Whitman Vignettes: Camden & Philadelphia
This exhibition, in conjunction with the 200th anniversary, on May 31, 2019, of the birth of Walt Whitman, will examine fragments from Whitman's later life, spent in Camden and Philadelphia, exploring his writings, his publications, his persona, his likenesses, his friendships, his death, and even his bridge.

This exhibition will be based on holdings in Penn's Walt Whitman Collections

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat & Sun, by prior arrangement

Free & open to the public

Kamin Gallery
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, first floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 18 -
August 11, 2019
Animal Tales
Sly foxes, ferocious lions, and slithering snakes are just some of the vivid and compelling images of animals that appear in the pages of manuscripts in the Walters Art Museum.

Dating between the 13th and 17th centuries, the 12 manuscripts in this exhibition reveal how animals were not mere decoration, but represented shared cultural knowledge like morals, stories, and fables. When viewed together, these texts reveal ways of communicating through images that, in our modern world of memes and emojis, is still relevant today. Animal Tales draws upon the Walters’ world-renowned manuscript and rare book collection that spans more than 1000 years and contains over 900 manuscripts, 1300 of the earliest printed books, and 2000 rare later editions from across the globe.

Wed – Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm
Mon & Tue CLOSED

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 24 -
September 22, 2019
Hogarth: Cruelty and Humor
The satirical scenes of the celebrated English artist William Hogarth (1697–1764) are iconic representations of eighteenth-century urban life at a time of great socio-economic disparity. An academic outsider and an activist, Hogarth was driven to innovate, creating new genres and modes of expression in his painting, printmaking, and drawing in his effort to elevate the status of British art. This exhibition will investigate the ways the artist used humor, satire, and political commentary to engage a broad audience and agitate for legislation and political goals.

The exhibition features the Morgan’s exceptional cache of six sheets preparatory for two of Hogarth’s most revered print series, both issued in February 1751: Beer Street and Gin Lane and The Four Stages of Cruelty. The story of Hogarth’s images reveal an artist who addressed the ills and injustices of life in a modern metropolis, exploring the connections between violence, crime, alcohol abuse, and cruelty to animals in ways that would amuse, occasionally shock, and edify his audience.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

Free Fri evenings 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 25 -
September 05, 2019
Everyone’s Art Gallery: Posters of the London Underground
In 1919, 39 posters came to the Art Institute of Chicago, courtesy of the Underground Electric Railways London. The posters, full of brilliant colors and innovative designs, were part of an effort to encourage Londoners to use this commercial transportation system: to visit the city’s cultural attractions, go shopping, attend sporting events, and even venture into the countryside—all by taking Underground trains and buses, of course. Installed outside Underground stations on public streets and on the front of buses that traversed the city, these posters formed a vibrant civic art presence—a public gallery available to all.

Over the next 20 years more posters arrived at the museum, coming at irregular intervals and eventually forming a collection of almost 350 artworks—an extraordinary sample from the golden age of this remarkable poster campaign, one that continues to this day. Until now, however, the story of how and why these posters came to Chicago has not been known. The architect of the poster campaign, from its inception in 1908 until 1939, was Frank Pick, an executive with London’s Underground. Pick's enthusiasm for art education led him to commission poster designs from many young artists. Indeed, it is likely that the close relationship between the Art Institute of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute was one reason that Pick chose the museum as the eventual keeper of this poster archive.

This exhibition, the first at the museum to showcase this unique collection, begins with a chronological sampling of the posters. Thematic sections feature popular subjects, such as the zoo, museums, and Hampton Court, the royal palace southwest of London on the Thames, while focused displays are devoted to three of the greatest artists who worked for the Underground: Charles Paine, Frederick Herrick, and one of the most illustrious poster artists of the 20th century, Edward McKnight Kauffer, who studied briefly at the School of the Art Institute on his way to Europe.

Among the show’s highlights is Charles Paine's clever take on King Henry the VIII, depicting him with large shears trimming the heads off his topiary queens in Hampton Court by Tram (1922). Others include Mary Koop's Summer Sales (1925), which invites viewers to follow a riot of brightly colored umbrellas toward their shopping destination; a modernist depiction of time by Clive Gardiner from 1928 urging riders to buy a season Underground ticket; and Harold Sandys Williamson’s Cheap Tickets to Town, Shop between 10 and 4 (1939), an almost surrealistic view of the London cityscape, its sky a sea of floating barrage balloons as protection from German bombs.

A century after the initial posters arrived at the museum, this exhibition features 100 posters—a celebration of the gift, Frank Pick’s inventive campaign, and the beautiful artworks it produced.

Daily 10:30am – 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

The Art Institute of Chicago
Michigan Avenue Entrance
111 South Michigan Avenue

Modern Wing Entrance
159 East Monroe Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
May 31 -
August 18, 2019
Among Others: Photography and the Group
Composed chiefly of works in the Morgan’s collection, this exhibition explores how photographers have represented the bonds uniting people, whether in group portraits or in serial imagery. In arranged sittings, form is content: when commissioned to photograph the royals of Germany and England at a wedding in 1894, James Russell and Son’s Studio instinctively centered its composition around the family’s matriarch, Queen Victoria. Camera artists sometimes insert themselves into the action, as Susan Meiselas did when mingling with carnival strippers, first to portray them behind the scenes and then to photograph those in the audience from a performer’s perspective. Action can also be a pose: in 1970, when asked to create a positive poster image for the Gay Liberation Front, Peter Hujar asked the group’s members to run toward him on the street, enacting their slogan, “Come Out!!” Ingenuity may be called for when one’s subjects are all too well-known: a press photographer, Pierre Ducatez, appealed to the primal desires of Beatles fans by zeroing in on the lips of each band member, creating a captivating game of who’s-who. Bringing together works from the 1860s to the present, Among Others poses questions about family, diversity, democracy, representation, and visual delight.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

Free Fri evenings 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 01 -
September 08, 2019
RALPH STEADMAN: A RETROSPECTIVE
Ralph Steadman was the artistic yin to Hunter S. Thompson’s literary yang. (Or maybe it was vice versa.) They were collaborators and friends for 30 years, Steadman providing exquisitely outrageous illustrations that were perfectly suited to Thompson’s gonzo writing.

Steadman’s world renown as an artist stems in part – but hardly in total – from that long creative relationship. A special exhibition at the Kansas City Public Library, Ralph Steadman: A Retrospective, explores the full range of his inimitable work, including illustrations for Alice in Wonderland and George Orwell’s Animal Farm; images of extinct, endangered, and imaginary birds created for the books Extinct Boids and Critical Critters; and of course, Steadman’s exquisitely grotesque artwork for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and other writings by Thompson.

Exclusive to the exhibition’s stay in Kansas City: more than a dozen of Steadman’s images from his coverage of the 1976 Republican Convention in KC, where he worked with former White House counsel and key Watergate figure John Dean for Rolling Stone magazine.

Approximately 100 of Steadman’s original works are featured in the exhibition at the downtown Central Library, 14 W. 10th St. The Kansas City Public Library is one of a limited number of venues nationwide chosen to host the retrospective, which is sponsored by United Therapeutics, Flying Dog, and Audible.

Mon - Wed 9am - 9pm
Thu - Fri 9:00 - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Central Library
The Kansas City Public Library
14 West 10th Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
June 04 -
October 27, 2019
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
Caen, FRANCE
Exhibit International
June 07 -
September 15, 2019
Walt Whitman: Bard of Democracy
“Comrades! I am the bard of Democracy,” Walt Whitman announced in a notebook in 1859. Over his 73 years (1819–1892), he essentially made good on that claim. From humble origins in Long Island and Brooklyn, he earned a global audience that never stops growing. On the two hundredth anniversary of his birth he continues to speak to new generations. The exhibition explores Whitman’s process of self-invention, from his early years as a journalist, through the early 1850s when Whitman began to write more privately and poetically, to his final years.

Whitman not only sounded a “barbaric yawp” over the rooftops of the world, but he also helped his country to reconcile its famous contradictions through his inclusivity and his extraordinary body of work. Several of Whitman’s notebooks will be on display, as well as his portraitist’s copy of Leaves of Grass (1855) and the famous letter written to Whitman by Ralph Waldo Emerson commending that book. The exhibition will establish Whitman’s unblinking witness to the Civil War and display the great poems that he wrote in honor of the martyred president including “O Captain! My Captain!” Also on view are documents from Oscar Wilde, Hart Crane, Federico García Lorca and Allen Ginsberg, which trace the writer’s influence on the twentieth century as well. The exhibition draws on the Morgan’s own holdings as well as generous loans from the great Whitman collections at the Library of Congress.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

Free Fri evenings 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 07 -
September 08, 2019
Leonardo da Vinci: A Mind in Motion
For the first time in the UK we bring together highlights from three of Leonardo da Vinci’s extraordinary notebooks to explore his fascination with motion, which he considered to be ‘the cause of all life’.

Marking the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death, this unique exhibition showcases pages from one of the British Library’s finest treasures, the Codex Arundel. It is displayed alongside the Codex Forster from the V&A and a selection of sheets from the Codex Leicester, widely considered to be one of Leonardo’s most important scientific notebooks and on display in this country for the first time since it was purchased by Bill Gates.

The pages are written in Leonardo’s distinctive mirror writing and packed with intricate drawings and diagrams. They illustrate how his detailed studies of natural phenomena – in particular of water – influenced his work both as an artist and an inventor. Marvel at Leonardo’s insights into subjects as varied as the formation of waves and air bubbles, river flow, the velocity of wind, and the nature of light and shadow.. View some of Leonardo’s designs for devices including an underwater breathing apparatus and a perpetual motion wheel capable of producing and harnessing energy.

Admire studies for his famous painting, The Virgin of the Rocks, revealing how his observations of nature in motion directly informed his ability to portray human movement in the artistic masterpieces for which he is known today.

9:30am - 18:00pm

PACCAR 2
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 07 -
October 14, 2019
American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs
Populated with toy cowboys and cavalry, Barbie dolls and baseball players, David Levinthal’s photographs reference iconic images and events that shaped postwar American society. Despite their playful veneer, Levinthal’s images provide a lens through which to examine the myths and stereotypes lurking within our most beloved pastimes and enduring heroes. In doing so, Levinthal encourages us to consider the stories we tell about ourselves—what it means to be strong, beautiful, masculine, feminine, and ultimately, American.

American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs brings together six of the artist’s best-known bodies of work to explore some myths found in American popular culture and their place in our collective memory. Created between 1984 and 2018, the series Modern Romance, American Beauties, Wild West, Barbie, Baseball, and History all explore quintessentially American themes and imagery. The exhibition includes more than 70 color photographs drawn from two recent gifts to SAAM. The exhibition is organized by Joanna Marsh, SAAM’s Deputy Education Chair, Head of Interpretation and Audience Research.

11:30am – 7pm

Free admission

Smithsonian American Art Museum 8th and F Streets, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 07, 2019 -
February 02, 2020
Cuban Caricature and Culture: The Art of Massaguer
With his biting political satire, celebrity caricatures, and magazine and advertising illustrations, graphic artist Conrado Walter Massaguer (1889–1965) helped shape the visual culture of his native Cuba between the 1920s and 1950s. This installation of works recently gifted to The Wolfsonian Library by Vicki Gold Levi will bring forth Massaguer’s legacy through dozens of works, from images of the “New Woman” flapper ideal (the so-called “Massa-girls”) in his magazine Social to depictions of tropical paradise for the Cuban Tourist Commission. Massaguer’s transnational reach will be shown in his covers for Collier’s and Life, while cartoons of visiting dignitaries and Hollywood stars will reveal how he rubbed shoulders with Franklin D. Roosevelt, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, and the King of Spain—all evidence of an artist at the center of Havana’s cosmopolitan culture in the decades before the Cuban Revolution.

Mon, Tue, Thu & Sat 10am – 6pm
Wed CLOSED
Fri 10am – 9pm (free 6 – 9pm)
Sun noon – 6pm

Members: FREE
Adults: $12
Seniors, students with ID, & children 6–18: $8
Children under 6: FREE
Students, faculty, & staff of the State University System of Florida: FREE

The Wolfsonian–FIU
1001 Washington Avenue (corner of 10th Street & Washington Avenue)
Miami Beach, FL
Exhibit South
June 08, 2019 -
January 12, 2020
Mid-Century Master: The Photography of Alfred Eisenstaedt
When he photographed her for the November 5, 1965 issue of LIFE Magazine, Alfred Eisenstaedt cemented Marjorie Merriweather Post’s place among the most notable people of the twentieth century. Already well-known as a generous philanthropist, businesswoman, and social figure, Post was featured in a thirty-page spread that showcased her generous spirit and gracious way of life. With his acumen for capturing larger-than-life personalities in natural poses and genuine moments, Eisenstaedt was the perfect photographer for highlighting her distinguishing features.

Featuring nearly fifty Eisenstaedt photographs and ephemera from his career in photojournalism, this special exhibition will explore the relationship between Post and Eisenstaedt that evolved over the course of the sessions, the illuminating photos of Post, and the broader body of Eisenstaedt’s work documenting life in in the mid-twentieth century.

In addition to the photos from the sessions with Post, highlights of the exhibition include portraits of other twentieth-century celebrities, such as Marilyn Monroe, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Albert Einstein, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Ernest Hemingway, and Frank Lloyd Wright. Other important prints to be featured are his Waiters on Skates series from 1932, his Farewell to Servicemen at Pennsylvania Station (1943), and his expressive Drum Major of the University of Michigan Rehearsing (1950). The exhibition will also introduce Eisenstaedt’s practices for successful images, such as his ability to conceive and capture candid moments, his skillful mastery of natural light, and his unobtrusive, relaxed approach to working with celebrities and dignitaries.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mom CLOSED

Adult: $18
Senior: $15
College Students: $10
Child (6-18) $5
Children under 6: free
Hillwood members: free

Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens
4155 Linnean Avenue
NW Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 14 -
October 06, 2019
Drawing the Curtain: Maurice Sendak’s Designs for Opera and Ballet
Renowned for his beloved and acclaimed children’s books, Maurice Sendak (1928–2012) was also an avid music and opera lover. In the late 1970s, he embarked on a successful second career as a designer of sets and costumes for the stage. Drawing the Curtain: Maurice Sendak’s Designs for Opera and Ballet will be the first museum exhibition dedicated to this aspect of his career. It will include storyboards, preparatory sketches, costume studies, luminous watercolors, and meticulous dioramas from Mozart’s Magic Flute, Janáček's Cunning Little Vixen, Prokofiev’s Love for Three Oranges, Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker, and an opera based on Sendak’s picture book Where the Wild Things Are.

The exhibition will include nearly 150 objects drawn primarily from the artist’s bequest to the Morgan of over 900 drawings. Sendak borrowed gleefully from a personal pantheon of artists, some of whom he encountered firsthand at the Morgan. Several such works, by William Blake, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Domenico and Giambattista Tiepolo, will be displayed alongside his designs. Although less well known than his book illustrations, Sendak’s drawings for the stage embody his singular hand, fantastical mode of storytelling, keen—sometimes bawdy—sense of humor, and profound love of music and art history.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

Free Fri evenings 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 22 -
September 15, 2019
N.C. Wyeth: New Perspecitves
Well known during the 20th century for his bold, imaginative illustrations that brought new characterizations to classic stories such as Treasure Island and The Boy’s King Arthur, N. C. Wyeth vigorously pursued parallel interests in painting landscapes, seascapes, portraits, still lifes, murals, and advertising images throughout his career. N. C. Wyeth: New Perspectives will be the first exhibition to examine in depth the entirety of Wyeth’s oeuvre, repositioning him within the greater context of early 20th century American visual culture.

A master of many styles and a brilliant colorist, Wyeth employed the skills honed in his illustration work to address various thematic and stylistic currents running through the first five decades of the twentieth century. While incorporating the best of Wyeth’s illustrations, the exhibition will also feature aspects of his art that until now have garnered less scholarly attention, significantly expanding the arc of his multi-faceted career.

N.C. Wyeth: New Perspectives will include approximately 70 paintings and drawings selected from major museums and private collections. A number of objects from the artist’s studio collection, ranging from Native American and Western artifacts to a first edition of Treasure Island, will also be included.

Generations of readers grew up with stories “Illustrated by N. C. Wyeth”—his name was as renowned as the authors whose stories he pictured. This exhibition will show, however, that exciting, enduring illustrations were only part of Wyeth’s legacy. Today, museum visitors and even many scholars tend to recognize him as Andrew Wyeth’s father, another siloed descriptor that also disregards the complete scope of his work. Recently the art world and the art market have been taking a fresh look at N. C. Wyeth’s art and achievements, and this exhibition will be a landmark of that assessment.

Open daily 9:30am – 5pm

$18 adults
$15 seniors (65+)
$6 students with ID & children ages 6-18
Free for children ages five & under & members of the Brandywine Conservancy & Museum of Art

Brandywine River Museum of Art
1 Hoffman's Mill Road
Chadds Ford, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 22 -
September 15, 2019
THE PURSUIT OF EVERYTHING: MAIRA KALMAN’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN
This colorful exhibition explores the extensive catalog of Maira Kalman’s imaginative stories and illustrations, which have delighted readers of all ages for more than 30 years.

Perhaps best known for her quirky New Yorker magazine covers and brilliant pictorial essays, Kalman (American, born 1949) has published more than a dozen books for adults and 18 acclaimed children’s books, beginning with the game-changing picture book Stay Up Late (1985), which gave visual form to the popular Talking Heads song from their Little Creatures album.

Since then, her works have followed the comic adventures of multiple beloved characters, including a dog poet named Max Stravinsky, and have addressed important historical people and events with books including Looking at Lincoln (2012) and the 9/11-inspired Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey (2002).

The Pursuit of Everything will provide an immersive panorama of Kalman’s picture book career spanning three decades, including newer publications like Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote (2018), authored by U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and the illustrated cookbook Cake (2018), written in collaboration with the food writer Barbara Scott-Goodman.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 9pm
Sun 12 noon - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

High Museum of Art
1280 Peachtree Street NE
Atlanta, GA
Exhibit South
June 29 -
August 25, 2019
Mapping Memory: Space and History in 16th-century Mexico
Mapping Memory: Space and History in 16th-century Mexico features a selection of maps from the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection at The University of Texas at Austin. Local artists crafted these unique materials by commission of the King of Spain to deepen his understanding of his territories in the so-called New World. The exceptional aesthetic value of these maps enhances their ethnographic content. The exhibition coincides with the 500thanniversary of the arrival of the Spanish in Mexico, aiming to provoke reflection on the complexities of the conquest of the Americas by acknowledging indigenous perspectives.

Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 11am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Third Thursday of every month
10am - 9pm

Blanton Museum of Art
The University of Texas at Austin
200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest